Sports Injuries

The Bowen Technique and Sports Injury Assessing correctly. Treating effectively.

The Bowen Technique is a remarkable hands on approach to retrieving normal
(for the individual) function of the fascia, soft tissue and biomechanics of the underlying skeletal structure.

Our simple goal is to gain balance in all areas of the body whether it is organic, myofascial or psychological impact of chronic pain or tension.

In the sports field we are often faced with more ballistic accidents where people meet damage from an external force whether that is a direct blow to the knee during a sliding tackle or a poor landing during martial arts. All these injuries can also occur, just walking down the street and missing a kerb. 

The fascia is an incredibly intelligent and highly responsive 3D environment that can snag and pull like gathering a towel together in the centre with your hands. This pushing and pulling in the body can lead to altered biomechanics and restricted soft tissue function in terms of nutrients, blood supply, energy transfer and lymph drainage. This becomes even more complex if the fascia has been invaded upon in open wounds, surgery or long term holding patterns.

Recently scientists are showing that fascia can actively contract (Robert Schleip 2006) and possesses huge neurological abilities in terms of communication, of a faster kind than motor unit response from peripheral to central. More of a matrix net approach.
Rich in mechanoreceptors, proprioceptors, stretch receptors and nocioceptors, the tensal qualities of a muscle group and it’s surrounding fascia both outside and through the muscle can adapt to take the foot off the hosepipe as such, especially when the body has experienced a traumatic injury when protective and sometimes not totally necessary inflammatory and swelling responses occur.

How do we do this? With Bowen… Gently. 
The fascia will only constrict and repel under pressure, so it needs to be whispered to, talked to, conversed with to allow it to open its secrets. The muscle and fascia ‘melting’ we see in clinic is a direct result of the receptors having a rethink about the area as a result of therapist contact. Recent research into interception as well starting to link the emotion of “feeling good” to more intuitive approaches such as Bowen. If the human experience is not in what we call “amygdala hijack” we have an improved environment for the potential to recover from injury.

Observation of surrounding biomechanics to look for a potential mechanism of injury and other presentations we may miss if we stay regional and keeping an open mind.
Treatment of injury using Bowen and some understanding of fascial planes and tracks to aid recovery speed and long-term resolution.
Introduction to rehabilitation for each presentation using a regional anatomical approach for acute injury and then a more dynamic approach for ongoing recovery and prevention.

There has recently been a move towards the idea that increased pressure can create a ‘better’ result in order to fit into the mainstream model of hands on approaches.
However, this really isn’t the case. The fascia is an incredibly intelligent and highly responsive 3D environment that can snag and pull like gathering a towel together in the centre with your hands. This pushing and pulling in the body can lead to altered biomechanics and restricted soft tissue function in terms of nutrients, blood supply, energy transfer and lymph drainage. This becomes even more complex if the fascia has been invaded upon in open wounds, surgery or long term holding patterns.

Recently scientists are showing that fascia can actively contract (Robert Schleip 2006) and possesses huge neurological abilities in terms of communication, of a faster kind than motor unit response from peripheral to central. More of a matrix net approach.
Rich in mechanoreceptors, proprioceptors, stretch receptors and nocioceptors, the tensal qualities of a muscle group and it’s surrounding fascia both outside and through the muscle can adapt to take the foot off the hosepipe as such, especially when the body has experienced a traumatic injury when protective and sometimes not totally necessary inflammatory and swelling responses occur.

How do we do this? With Bowen… Gently. 
The fascia will only constrict and repel under pressure, so it needs to be whispered to, talked to, conversed with to allow it to open its secrets. The muscle and fascia ‘melting’ we see in clinic is a direct result of the receptors having a rethink about the area as a result of therapist contact. Recent research into interception as well starting to link the emotion of “feeling good” to more intuitive approaches such as Bowen. If the human experience is not in what we call “amygdala hijack” we have an improved environment for the potential to recover from injury.